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the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads to conflict. let's get some conversation from those of you who are thinking sisley that this is supposed to be a no-nonsense forum on military and secret strategy. i don't want you to predict war, bu
the first thing you do in j.a.g. school, you have a discussion about the difference between the law of war and criminal law. and every military lawyer is taught from the very beginning of their career that law of war detention is designed to neutralize the enemy and to gather intelligence about the enemy. there is a reason that when we capture somebody in a war, we don't give them a trial by jury, we don't give them a lawyer. we have got 3,000 people in american military custody in afghanistan that were captured on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were
massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth united states senate which changed the united states of america. 20 years ago we passed the americans with disabilities act and reset a disability should not disqualify you for them at you in terms of their opportunity as an american. for some people said this is obvious. everyone knows. it was also obvious was discrimination taking place all across this great land. we remove that barrier to discrimination and in passing the americans with disabilities act can we step forward at the nation. with their fear and concern? i can recall going to greene county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the ci
had never met him. it was all under a little-known law that's designed to keep native american children in native american homes, but is it the right thing to do? we will update you, next. i hav, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer on facebook. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> a train derailment in new jersey causes a highly toxic chemical leak into a river. so what caused this disaster? that's ahead. tions, but obligat. tions, but
from the only parents she ever knew and returned to her biological father under a little known law designed to keep native american children in native american homes. we'll update you on baby veronica's story next. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions wh
the only parents she ever knew and returned to her biological father under a little known law designed to keep native american children in native american homes. we'll update you on baby veronica's story next. >>> a train derailment in new jersey causes a highly toxic chemical leak into a river. so what caused this disaster? that's ahead.d# 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) to a schwab ira, and we'll help you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 find new ways to make your money work harder. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're ready to teach your old 401(k) some new tricks... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 talk to chuck. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can receive up to $600. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see schwab.com tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for terms and conditions. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call, click or visit tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to open an account today. good boy. there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! whoa! so why are you doing his?
, the health care law may face in the coming days and in the coming years with julie rovner of n.p.r., and we'll be right back. >> program under began under tugwell who was one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living, this was back when we didn't have television. we had radio, but a lot of places didn't have electricity so they couldn't listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in parts of the country. royce striker, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of amer
of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that hurts the people who need jobs and who would be happy to be on a payroll where they would be putting their own contributions into social security and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to
that could supersede current u.s. laws in some ways and impose mandatory limits on carbon emissions. president obama failed to get a cap-and-trade will pass in his first term. is he quietly planning a new carbon crackdown through other means? joining me now is lou dobbs, host of "lou dobbs tonight" on the fox business network. that was one agenda item he could not get through. cap and trade. even when the democrats controlled the house as well, they just couldn't get that through. what would he be doing through the united nations and he could do through the u.s. congress? lou: the efforts that he is undertaking here, so little is known about what we are discussing in qatar, at the meeting of the united nations we are talking about laying out a mission schedule through 2035. without any public discussion, there is nothing about it than a presidential debate, as you know. this could have a mammoth effect on this economy. we are talking about tax levels and also significant pressure on the gdp of this country, the growth rate. and some are saying, it would be a negative to drive the ec
are reacting emotionally to this terrible crime in kansas city. but the problem america has is not law abiding citizens possessing weapons. that's not damaging the nation. crimes committed with handguns and out-of-control people that's what's hurting the u.s.a. you will never stop crimes of madness, you are never going to stop them like the kansas city situation. you can put violent criminals away for a long time if they use a gun during the commission of a crime. and that should be done. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction. joining us from washington mary catherine ham and juan williams from washington. where am i going wrong, juan. >> you said people feel more secure if they are able to own a gun. i have got to say first off the bat, bill. i think you are exactly right about everybody's right to have a gun the supreme court has reaffirmed it. i differ about my understanding what the founding fathers wrote. i think they were writing about a militia. the court sides with bill o'reilly or bill o'reilly sides with the court. we have some guns in this country right now and whe
, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody's. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. it's not like folks who make more than 250 aren't getting a tax break, they've getting a tax break on the first 250, just like everybody else. >> congressman cole first said this in a closed door meeting with republicans yesterday. he said basically exactly what president obama just said and he then expanded on his comments instead of denying them or refusing to comment at all, which he could have done. house speaker john boehner, who needs other loyal republicans to start talking sense to crazy tea par party, he was outraged by his suggestion. >> you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> but that didn't stop congressman cole from going on hardball today continuing to sell the idea of making peace with the president for the sake of 98% of american taxpayers.
experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked for the conservative judge james buckley on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit following graduation. so you have to ask why did it take seven months for the senate to finally after waiting seven months, we'll talk about it for 20 minutes, then we'll vote his nomination. why the seven-month delay? republican obstruction. now, after this vote, the senate remains backlogged with 17 judicial nominations that go back to before the august, the august recess. senate republicans are establishing another harmful precedent by refusing to proceed on judicial nominees with bipartisan support before the end of the session. they held up judicial nominees three years ago, they did it two years ago, they did it last year. now they are doing it again this year. they found a new way to employ their own trick of a pocket filibuster. they stalled nominees into the next year. and then they forced the senate in the new year to work on nominees from the past year. delay and delay and delay and push other confirmations back in time, then cut off
the year. am i right? >> well, the only way to guarantee deals you pass it into law. then it's a lot harder to change them. and my only point is, you know, if we had a game, and every time the term fiscal cliff came up people had to donate a dollar to something, you'd be amazed in the course of a week or two how often this has been repeated like a mantra. i compared to a great essay by tom wolf in which people chanted and made noise in order to get their way. i think we ought to recognize this entire fiscal cliff is an artificial invention of washington, created by people in the congress and the presidency, and it can be broken down by them into a series of steps that can be taken without having to be rushed into one gigantic last-minute, little understood, with no hearings, one vote up or down, i think it's a terrible way to govern the united states. >> greta: well, the sequestration deadline is coming up the 1st of january. what people are saying on capitol hill, the president is saying, congress is saying, it may be scary stuff, but if we go over the fiscal cliff that all sorts of things
. there is no reason to mess around with the word christmas. as we reported, president grant signed a law making christmas a federal holiday. there really isn't any controversy. unless congress revokes the holiday. christmas is christmas. it celebrates the birth of jesus. therefore, the word christmas images of jesus, and a songs or poems or stories discussing him are appropriate under the law. secular progressives hate that. they don't like public displays of jesus because christians believe he's god. and christians are the enemy. this has been going on for ten years now. really got heat add few years ago when dopey department store chains ordered their employees not to say the word christmas. as you may remember, we got involved here at the factor factor. that largely stopped. now misguided politicians like lincoln chaffey trying to use their power to diminish christmas because the private sector has largely surrendered to the common good. the reason the department stores folded was because millions of you wouldn't buy their stuff. not only are secular progressives serious about christmas in g
healthcare. >>> i know some people want me to bypass congress and change the laws on my own. believe me -- [ applause ] and believe me, right now dealing with congress, the id idea -- >> that was a tough one. that was the president getting heckled last year. this summer those dreamers had their demands met, at least in part with the deferred action for childhood arrivals ordered by president obama. so far, 310,000 young people have applied. that action may in fact have bore fruit for the president on election night when he took home 71% of the latino vote. yet, no comprehensive reform had been attempted by the obama add mrpgs. many are still looking to the president for leadership on the issue. back with my panel. i'm interested in this because this is a moment on the one hand they're heckling, but the next moment they do basically what i have to read from a page in the republican handbook, they hand to him a policy. they're like here, do this. and sure enough, he does it. we end up with deferred action. >> right. >> is that the model for how we're going to get immigration reform done s
of references to islamic sharia law. in cairo, tens of thousands protested, denouncing president mohammed morsi. in an all-night session of parliament dominated by islamic. opposition groups say that the document has a clear view towards sharia law. raising fears of state enforced islamic moral code. the draft is expected to be delivered to president morsi tomorrow. new controversy today over a pension crisis running the state of illinois. and whether american taxpayers and all the other states may soon have to put their bill. according to the pew research center, illinois has the most underfunded public pension system in the entire country. the funding ratio of just 45%. 45% funded. estimated $95 billion short of where they need to be to pay out the promised pension. a problem that pat quinn says needs to be fixed to find a solution. it is harder to come by. here is a video that we just released. the governor squeezing the pension python. >> sometimes they make smaller payments than what they promise. the investments that we made with that pension fund, the great recession can hit us hard. plu
as result of it they created a loan program that got me into college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bowles report but i didn't agree with every aspect of it, but i thought that was a sensible approach to breathing life into social security beyond its current longevity. i also like and it to 82 when asking your, and 83 and was told that social security is on its way out in six months, we'll be out of money.
, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not done their jobs in the years. they need to listen to the american people. we picked barack obama up for a reason because we like his policies. they need to get a clue. they are already struggling and having a hard time. if they do not get a clue, they will not be back there. host: republicans say the president and democrats are not making any good-faith offers, the same thing democrats say about republicans. how do we get them to move past with the speaker is calling a stalemate? caller: the people need to look at their actions, not what people are saying. these obstructionists' have locked down congress for years now. they are just continuing to do it. they refuse to admit to obama has a mandate to tax these rich people. just the other day the corporate income is up to 1175 trillion dollars. these corporations are sitting on this money. they sat on it all through the election to make obama look bad. i kn
on this? put up the label tell us what the calorie count is. nyu went into the fast food places your law went into effect and people said yeah it's great we can see the calorie count and we are paying more attention to that now. then they look at the receipt and they saw they were eating more calories. the best thing we can do is give them the choice the option. >> you wrote a book "everything i want to do is illegal." (laughter) >> what is your point. >> my point is every time the government penetrates into the food system the abuses mount up on the big guys and little guys like us get rooted back to the table due to a smothering bunch of regulations. >> the little guys it puts them out of business the big guys can afford all of these rules? >> what absolutely. the regulations are unscaleable. they say they are wonderful when you say them but when you get them on the ground the prototypes who want to bring innovation to the marketplace have such large over head to get them are still borned because they have to be born too big. >> joel drinks milk that hasn't been pasteurized. raw milk h
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
bee" reports a federal judge is barring the state of california from enforcing its new law banning day conversion therapy. two mental health providers and a former patient are suing to overturn the ban. judge william shub ruling the first amendment rights of mental health professionals out-weigh concerns about the concerns of potential dangers associated with their practices. >>> a new orleans man has been fired from his job at a convenience store an he's facing a criminal citation if you can believe it police say he booted an ambulance that was responding to an emergency call for a man with chest pain. there is a sign at the store which warns that vehicles left unattended in the parking lot will be booted. the man claims he did not know the vehicle was an ambulance when he put the boot on it. it's clear to us that it is an ambulance. this guy is not from this country. he is telling police officers i had no idea this was an emergency vehicle. at least that is his excuse. this particular place enforces that you cannot be in there more than ten minutes without being booted. he was doing
-1996. they passed 333 bills into law, with just weeks to go, the 112th congress has passed only 196 bills into law. many of those bills ceremonial. so in order to beat the 104th, the 112th congress has to pass 138 more bills. it's a lot of numbers. that's why we put them on the screen there. they also have to help us avoid the fiscal cliff. as if that was not bad enough, according to a recent gallup poll, only 18% of americans say they approve of the job that lawmakers are doing on capitol hill. and does the republican party's hope for 2016 lie deep in the heart of texas? that's the buzz about state senator-elect ted cruz, who says the gop needs to be more articulate in its message and rebrand itself under a banner he calls, quote, and remember these words. you'll hear them again, "opportunity conservatism." opportunity conservatism. even though his second inauguration is weeks away, president obama is prepping for another campaign. this one to raise money to build his official library. presidential libraries are a chance for every leader of the free world to shape his or her legacy. while it's an
, many of them have american children. yet without any way, currently, of getting right with the law. what we need to do in immigration reform is require that people who are here illegally get right with the law rather than prevent them from getting right with the law. which is what we do currently. so again, while stem immigration is very important, my colleagues are being asked in a closed proto sess to weigh that with the issue of immigrants from the ukraine and albania, at the same time the bill could increase, will increase, the number of illegal immigrants in this country, perhaps increasing the number of illegal immigrants will redouble the efforts of this congress to address this issue but given the enormous dwention of the problem already and the complete lack of consideration of any meaningful immigration bill by this congress to solve our broken immigration system, inle not holding my breath. the zero sum bill on the floor asks us to weight one class of immigrants at the expense of another. in effect, trying to play politics and avoid solving our imdepration crisis. -- and
in the u.s. senate to pass important legislation, including the grand rudman deficit law. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician. he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second, fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good. he had the carriage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate which talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he expressed his hopes for the future of the senate, saying it is a special place with special people. i hope in the coming years that the i
through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add a note of caution. s
thing, protecting ourselves. you're violating the law of the world, and we're holding you. i understand not in my backyard problems, and i certainly understand that we're not going to be trying these folks under our civil system. >> sean: are we or aren't we, though? >> i don't know, sean. that's the problem. >> sean: we had promises in the past that appear to be broken. >> right. >> and a setup report that says, oh, yeah we can hold these -- >> sean: this goes back -- >> they play by their own rules, sean. that's the problem. legally speaking they're finding a way to get around it and circumvent the rules to make it work based on the promises that they made prior to the election. that's what this is. i'm not surprised. they said they wanted to do this, tried to back off it, because it's controversial and improper. why would you, given the prison population, put these people in to create more domestic terrorists? >> sean: i think i know the answer. it seems to be rooted in man-caused disaster, overseas contingency, fort hood is workplace violent, and can't label benghazi a terrorist att
into a dictator who is ramming through a constitution that while it does not specify sharia law as the ruling factor nonetheless has various clauses that take the country toward sharia law over the coming years. i think they are embarrassed. we can't change egypt. but we give them well over $1 billion in aid a year and we can play on the margins. bill: many people think egypt is the next iran if morsi continues on the path he's on. do we cut off aid in this case? >> the bod i language, the tone suggests the white house is willing to go along with morsi. the reason morsi and the muslim brotherhood are pushing this through so swiftly is because the egyptian economy is tanking. tourism has almost zeroed out. when was the last time you bought a product manufactured in egypt. beyond the religion except for the real he can realists, what the poor of egypt want is a job. they want economic improvements and morsi knows he can't deliver on a reasonable time frame so he's ramming through this constitution hell for leather because he can do it now and wouldn't be able to do it later. bill: i was surpris
four weeks to go until the deadline. be careful what you say in a local police want a law, new law requiring that text messages be saved for two years. how do you feel about that? ever texted something you wish would go away right now? there is of course the privacy issue as well. well, here comes the judge. he will be new at 10 on this one. got it. shares of darden restaurants, they're down today and they're the company that runs olive garden, red lobster, and they're down a lot. why is that, nicole? >> this is not good news here, they did a ton of promotions and now they're saying the promotions didn't work and in turn they're expecting numbers for the earnings season that will be below the analyst expectations and they're expecting sales at the olive garden to be down 3.2%. and at red lobster, 2.7% so sales are weakening, the earnings per share below what they anticipated and so, now, the ceo, so interesting, we need to come up with a new plan and we are going to work on different promotion because the current quarter is disappointing. do you think? >> well, nicole, hold on a se
sponsored it was signed in to law by governor ginned l, it's been ruled unconstitutional. we had a similar kind of challenge in the state of florida. these are setbacks that require constant vigilance and continued work. there will be pushback galore going forward. if we stay true to these five principles, five ideas and we're faithful in the implementation we can reverse the trend and shake the complacent sei that exists in the country. one of the great challenge for our country is to raise accountability, raise standards to set higher expectations of what the next generation needs to know. benchmark it to the world. make it competitive with the world's best. michael talked about how great britain has done that successfully. the united states needs to transform its system of expectations in the same way. common core state standards is the right step in that direction. 46, i think, states have embraced the idea of fewer, higher expectations that require critical thinking skills that are benchmarked to the best in the world. common core will also bring out, unfortunately, for those that are
, it is not an automatic. if they do pursue citizenship-- which they can under the law as it is today-- they would go behind the people who are already in line so that there is a fairness in the system to those who have waited for years to become regularized. but they will have a preference in that they will be here legally, can work, and build up all of their seniority while they are waiting in the line. >> suarez: senator, would you say the prospects for a bill of this kind have changed? have gotten better since the election? >> i do think that people are now realizing that we've got to have immigration reform and speaking only for myself i believe that doing immigration reform in pieces is going to be achievable rather than trying to do comprehensive which gets bogged down in extraneous issues that make it very hard to come to a total big conclusion. >> suarez: representative gutierrez, today the hispanic caucus laid out a set of principles it would want to see in any immigration reform bills. given what you and the caucus members said today, is the senator's achieve proposal at least a place to b
really heavy lifting jobs. it's different if you're working in a law firm and they keep you around for a few more years rather than you're driving a semi ray cross the country on route 70 or 80 all night long. you may not want a guy 730 years o -- 70 years old or a woman driving that truck. i really think you have to find something not -- i think the word hardship, not handicap, whether it be a hardship type role that are recognized as such where you get to retire sooner. i think we can deal with that over time but it takes more finesse. >> george will in his column today writes this, with a chip on his shoulder larger than -- >> i think will has a chip on his shoulder. >> -- barack obama is approaching his second term by replicating the m is stake of his first. now he seeks another surge of statism enlarging the portion of gross domestic product grasped by government and dispensed by politics. i guess that's how he describes keeping middle class tax cuts but while this may cause apoplexy among some republicans, isn't it time they realize that a majority of people voted for governm
nato is through continued development of democracy and the rule of law. there have been increasing pressure on the president to resign prior to the constitutional end of his term in october of 2013. while the new majority may see this as a logical next step to finalizing the transfer of power, attempting to have them give up their position -- the prosecutor's office arrested three officers of the government charged with unspecified abuses of power. georgia's made enormous power over the past two months. progress which very few predicted would require. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from vermont seek recognition? mr. welch: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from vermont is recognized for one minute. mr. welch: i thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's been 141 days, that's how long it's been since the house agriculture committee on a bipartisan basis passed the farm bill by a vote of 35-1. that's th
that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the president promised a balanced plan, a balanced approach. he must have said eight thousand times. then he finally puts out his offer, it's a plan that doubled the tax hikes that he campaigned on and it adds about $150 billion more, not less to the deficit in and new spending. to republicans with that kind of equivalent of lucy and the football and they are laying flat on their backs? >> republicans scoffed at this first fo
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> governor malloy. >> this is the problem, right? there are no rules in washington. when there are rules, they get changed to any argument you like. you can hire an economist to say what you like. >> they are the worst. >> all you are doing is arguing over the 20% in the middle. >> this is an amazing vision of politi politics. one politician, one economist, it's true. it's absolutely true. any argument, you can get a politician, economist and 40 people. >>> as long as you have a party label. >> exactly. >> then it enters, once you get to 40 and 40, it enters a round where it's debated as if reality is debated. it's not what has been debated in this country for a long time. there are no hard and fast rules that apply. it is the political argument that w
nation's treaty. it does nothing -- doesn't change any existing law, doesn't give it any authority at all in the united states. it doesn't make any new laws in the united states. all the treaty says get this it encourages other nations to give staled people the same rights that they enjoy in the united states. they enjoy in the united states under the americans with disabilities acts with 1990, which bob dole championed and george h.w. bush signed into law. it's a great law that has helped millions of americans: 154 countries, other nations have endorsed this and saying disabled people should have same rights other americans enjoy like they do in the united states of america. it needed add two-thirds vote. john kerry was the champion who carried it on the floor in the house, in the senate and said come on. here is bob dole. he is here for a reason. >> that's why an 89-year-old veteran one week removed from bethesda naval hospital comes back to the senate on an early december day, because it matters. >> bill: and yet, the republicans, what do the
the manufacturing company at noon eastern an c-span2 3. >> worked his way up, went to harvard law school and then immigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its hey day. he arrived after about a month's journey by shi ship, by stagecoach, by train and arrived on this steam boat in this muddy mining town boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in a log cabin and worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. and got involved politically and ran for congress eight terms. and then befriended abraham lincoln from illinois. and then grant. and as they were on the rice, wash burn stayed with them as a close colleague during the civil war. and after grant was elected president he initially appointed him secretary of state. and at that time he became very ill. so after about ten days, he submitted his resignation to president grant and so he accepted his resignation. so over the next several months he refained his health which was always very fradge jill. so grant then offered him the position as interior -- ambassador to france. >> providing politi
raised its head and the super committee deadlocked 6-6 which under the law left the meat cleaver to drop. the budget meat ax to drop. and that's what we're facing. we're facing something that nobody ever intended to go into effect. so how do we get out of this? we have people of goodwill that have to be reasonable and utilize a little commonsense, lessen their partisanship, lessen their ideological rigi rigidity, and that's the atmosphere that we can come together in. now, i want to tell a story and then i'm going to sit down, mr. president. i want to tell you the story about one of the brightest shining moments in government occurred back in 1983 when this senator was air youn was a youn. we were within six months of social security running out of money. and two old irishmen -- one who was president, his name was reagan; and the other one who was speaker, and his name was o'neill -- decided that they were going to do something about this. they were reasonable people who could operate in a bipartisan way and a nonideological way. and they said, what we're going to do is take this subject
that if it could not pass that two-part test, then it should not become a law in the united states of america. he passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempo
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